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    trigeminal neuralgia-suicidal diseaseTrigeminal Neuralgia: Treatment, Procedure, Cost And Side Effects What is the treatment? Trigeminal neuralgia is a condition that results in chronic pain in the face, particularly in the trigeminal nerve. This condition often occurs in women who are aged over 50, however there are fewer than a million cases per year in India, making this condition a rare one. The pain experienced as a part of this condition can often be triggered by speaking, chewing, or brushing the teeth. There is no cure for this condition and the treatment options mainly focus on making it a more manageable condition to live with. Trigeminal neuralgia is treated with the help of medications. The medicines that will be prescribed function by blocking the pain receptors so that you don’t feel it. Pain management is a large part of living with this condition and you may be prescribed anti-spasmodic medicines, anticonvulsants, or even botox injections to help you with the pain. However, medication is not the only answer. There are many surgical procedures that can be used to control this condition and make it easier to live with. Some of the surgical options include microvascular decompression and brain stereotactic radio surgery. Since this condition occurs mainly in women over 50, the treatments that are employed take into consideration the patient’s medical history and age. Once the severity of the pain is mapped, the doctor will decide what treatment options will suit you the most. How is the treatment done? Trigeminal neuralgia is diagnosed on the basis of the type of pain you are experiencing, the part of the face that hurts, and the triggers that activate the pain. With this condition, the pain is often short and sharp and triggered by any stimulation to the cheeks, such as chewing, speaking, or even brushing your teeth. A neurological examination can help doctors understand what is causing the pain. In some cases, an MRI scan is also recommended to get a clearer picture of the problem. Once trigeminal neuralgia is diagnosed, the treatment can begin. When it comes to the medicines that can be prescribed for this treatment, they range in type from antispasmodic and anticonvulsants, to botox injections. Anticonvulsants can help control the trigeminal nerve in the face in order to lessen the pain. Antispasmodic medications also work on a similar principal. Botox injections are also known to lessen the pain in the nerve, however further studies may be needed to substantiate this. Trigeminal neuralgia can also be controlled with the help of surgical options. With microvascular decompression, an incision is made behind the ear on the side of the face where you feel the pain. The doctor removes the arteries and veins that come in contact with the nerve, and then adds a soft cushion between the nerve and other arteries. With brain stereotactic radio surgery, the goal is to destroy the root of this nerve. A controlled shot of radiation is given to the nerve to make it stop functioning. The relief in this form of treatment is gradual, but the treatment itself can be very effective. By destroying the nerve, you eliminate the chances of it transmitting the pain to your brain. Who is eligible for the treatment? (When is the treatment done?) Once trigeminal neuralgia is diagnosed, you can seek out the treatment. It is better to start with the medicinal treatments before going in for surgery. However, if they don’t work, you can certainly explore the surgical options. Who is not eligible for the treatment? Sometimes, pain in the face is caused to due multiple sclerosis. It may imitate the symptoms and signs of trigeminal neuralgia but it is an entirely different condition. If you are suffering from multiple sclerosis, then seeking out treatment for trigeminal neuralgia will not help you with your condition. The doctor must treat the sclerosis first for you to experience any relief from the pain. Are there any side effects? As is the case with most treatments, there are certain side effects to be vary of. Anticonvulsants can lead to side effects like dizziness, nausea, drowsiness, and confusion. Certain anticonvulsants have negative effects on people with Asian descent. Antispasmodic agents also have a few side effects such as confusion, drowsiness, and nausea. Multiple botox injections can eventually make it harder to move your face naturally. It can also give you a stiff and shiny appearance. Microvascular decompression has side effects that include stroke, facial numbness, loss of hearing, and facial weakness. Brain stereotactic radio surgery can lead to developing numbness in the face as well. Surgery in general comes with side effects like bruising, swelling, and pain. What are the post-treatment guidelines? With some medications, you have to monitor your diet and control your lifestyle. Since trigeminal neuralgia can mostly be treated through pain management techniques, identifying and controlling your exposure to your triggers can go a long way in helping you. For instance, if your trigger is a cold breeze that brushes against your cheek, you may have to limit your exposure to the same. How long does it take to recover? It can take up to a month for the treatment to start taking effect. What is the price of the treatment in India? The surgical treatments range in price from Rs. 50, 000 to Rs. 1, 50, 000, depending on where you are getting the procedures done from. Are the results of the treatment permanent? There is no cure for trigeminal neuralgia, therefore the treatment results cannot be permanent. The treatment focusses on reducing and managing the pain you feel and you can expect the pain to swing from low to high throughout your life. The trick is to identify the treatment options that work best for you and continue to administer them as and when they are needed. What are the alternatives to the treatment? There are a few alternative treatments that are being explored for this condition. One such treatment is injecting glycerol injections at the base of the skull in order to damage the trigeminal nerve in the face. Balloon compression is also a treatment that can be used to damage the nerve sufficiently. Radiofrequency thermal lesioning can also be used for the same purpose. It damages the nerve fibres that are associated with pain. Safety: High Effectiveness: Medium Timeliness: Medium Relative Risk: Low Side Effects: Medium Time For Recovery: Medium
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    What Causes Neck Pain? dr sanjay sharma interventional pain physician says Your neck is made up of vertebrae that extend from the skull to the upper torso. Cervical discs absorb shock between the bones. The bones, ligaments, and muscles of your neck support your head and allow for motion. Any abnormalities, inflammation, or injury can cause neck pain or stiffness. Many people experience neck pain or stiffness occasionally. In many cases, it’s due to poor posture or overuse. Sometimes, neck pain is caused by injury from a fall, contact sports, or whiplash. Most of the time, neck pain isn’t a serious condition and can be relieved within a few days. But in some cases, neck pain can indicate serious injury or illness and require a doctor’s care. If you have neck pain that continues for more than a week, is severe, or is accompanied by other symptoms, seek medical attention immediately. Causes of neck pain Neck pain or stiffness can happen for a variety of reasons.depend on pathology. Muscle tension and strain This is usually due to activities and behaviors such as: poor posture working at a desk for too long without changing position sleeping with your neck in a bad position jerking your neck during exercise Injury The neck is particularly vulnerable to injury, especially in falls, car accidents, and sports, where the muscles and ligaments of the neck are forced to move outside of their normal range. If the neck bones (cervical vertebrae) are fractured, the spinal cord may also be damaged. Neck injury due to sudden jerking of the head is commonly called whiplash. Heart attack Neck pain can also be a symptom of a heart attack, but it often presents with other symptoms of a heart attack, such as: shortness of breath sweating nausea vomiting arm or jaw pain If your neck hurts and you have other symptoms of heart attack, call an ambulance or go to the emergency room immediately. Meningitis Meningitis is an inflammation of the thin tissue that surrounds the brain and spinal cord. In people who have meningitis, a fever and a headache often occur with a stiff neck. Meningitis can be fatal and is a medical emergency. If you have the symptoms of meningitis, seek help immediately. Other causes Other causes include the following: Rheumatoid arthritis causes pain, swelling of the joints, and bone spurs. When these occur in the neck area, neck pain can result. Osteoporosis weakens bones and can lead to small fractures. This condition often happens in hands or knees, but it can also occur in the neck. Fibromyalgia is a condition that causes muscle pain throughout the body, especially in the neck and shoulder region. As you age, the cervical discs can degenerate. This is known as spondylosis, or osteoarthritis of the neck. This can narrow the space between the vertebrae. It also adds stress to your joints. When a disk protrudes, as from a trauma or injury, it may add pressure on the spinal cord or nerve roots. This is called a herniated cervical disk, also known as a ruptured or slipped disk. Spinal stenosis occurs when the spinal column narrows and causes pressure on the spinal cord or the nerve roots as it exits the vertebrae. This can be due to long-term inflammation caused by arthritis or other conditions. In rare instances, neck stiffness or pain occurs due to: congenital abnormalities infections abscesses tumors cancer of the spine When to see your doctor If symptoms persist for more than a week, consult with your doctor. You should also see a doctor if you have: severe neck pain without apparent cause lump in your neck fever headache swollen glands nausea vomiting trouble swallowing or breathing weakness numbness tingling pain that radiates down your arms or legs inability to move your arms or hands inability to touch your chin to your chest bladder or bowel dysfunction If you’ve been in an accident or fall and your neck hurts, seek medical care immediately.
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    trigeminal neuralgia? suicidal disease-electric shock over face? dr sanjay sharma, interventional spine pain physician JPRC SPINE& JOINT CARE, JAIPUR expert view Trigeminal Neuralgia, or TN, is a cranial nerve condition that causes intense facial pain on one or both sides of the face in sudden and sporadic episodes. most often its noticed over one side of face but some timetimes happened on both side of face, Though the pain typically only lasts seconds, many people with Trigeminal Neuralgia describe the pain as debilitating and unbearable. Usually, this impulsive pain occurs unexpectedly and without warning, though some patients report tingling, Numbness or Achiness in the days leading up to an attack. Pain comes on quickly and frequently for several days, weeks or even months during each episode. Doctors are not sure of the exact cause of TN, but it is believed to be associated with pressure placed on the trigeminal nerve by surrounding blood vessels. Fortunately, treatments are available to help TN patients manage pain and reduce episodic recurrences. primarily most of general physician or Neurophysicians think its only managed by medicines, after a long fail trials, he refer to neurosurgeon for brain surgery, like open surgery of brain-patient become reluctant for any surgery. now we had many minimal invasive procedure like radiofrequency ablation, ballon decompression, GAMA knife etc radiofrquency ablation is one supposed to be safest and non cutting, bloodless day care procedure, under local anesthesia, and mild sedation.results of pain relief by rf ablation are immediately,
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    How Do You Treat foot drop ?     Question: My mother has nerve compression in her low back, which has resulted in foot drop of her right foot. What other options does she have besides surgery? Answer: To help our readers who aren't familiar with drop foot (sometimes called foot drop), this is a nerve and muscular disorder that prevents the patient from lifting the front of his or her foot. A person with drop foot will notice a change in their gait (known as steppage gait), and patients may also experience pain and/or numbness. Nerve compression that leads to foot drop is typically caused by a herniated disc in the lumbar spine, specifically at L4-L5; the fourth and fifth vertebrae in the low back. Most herniated discs get better with time and do not require surgery. There are many non-surgical treatments for herniated discs, including bed rest, exercises medication and  minimal invasive techniques. Unfortunately, with foot drop, the longer the nerve is compressed, the less chance for recovery. The nerves that elevate the foot, and are affected in foot drop, are the most sensitive nerves lumbar spine—and the least resilient. Now, you might wonder how nerve compression in your low back affects the nerves in your legs. The reason is that the nerves affected in foot drop begin in your low back and extend down to your legs and feet. When the nerve is compressed for very long, cells in the nerve become damaged and the nerve cannot transmit the signal to the feet. This nerve damage can be irreversible. Consequently, foot drop is often permanent, even if the nerves are decompressed surgically. Regardless, the duration of foot drop and the amount of compression should be evaluated by a surgeon.
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    What is TN? Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is considered to be one of the most painful afflictions known to medical practice. TN is a disorder of the fifth cranial (trigeminal) nerve. The typical or “classic” form of the disorder (called TN1) causes extreme, sporadic, sudden burning or shock-like facial pain in the areas of the face where the branches of the nerve are distributed – lips, eyes, nose, scalp, forehead, upper jaw, and lower jaw. The pain episodes last from a few seconds to as long as two minutes. These attacks can occur in quick succession or in volleys lasting as long as two hours. The “atypical” form of the disorder (called TN2), is characterized by constant aching, burning, stabbing pain of somewhat lower intensity than TN1. Both forms of pain may occur in the same person, sometimes at the same time. Biology of TN The trigeminal nerve is one of 12 pairs of nerves that are attached to the brain. The nerve has three branches that conduct sensations from the upper, middle, and lower portions of the face, as well as the oral cavity, to the brain. (See Figure 1) More than one nerve branch can be affected by the disorder. Rarely, both sides of the face may be affected at different times in an individual, or even more rarely at the same time (called bilateral TN). Figure 1: Distribution of the 5th Cranial Nerve: Disorders of the Maxillary and Mandibular Branches Can Present as a Toothache Causing Patients to Seek Dental Treatment. fpa What Causes TN? TN is associated with a variety of conditions. It can be caused by a blood vessel pressing on the trigeminal nerve as it exits the brain stem, which prompts the wearing away or damage to the protective coating around the nerve (the myelin sheath). The intense flashes of pain can be triggered by vibration or contact with the cheek (such as when shaving, washing the face, or applying makeup), brushing teeth, eating, drinking, talking, or being exposed to the wind. People with TN avoid social contact and daily activities such as eating and talking because they fear an attack. Pain from TN is frequently very isolating and depressing for the individual. Depression and sleep disturbance may render individuals more vulnerable to pain and suffering. Thus, there are individual, family, and societal costs of TN. Diagnosis Issues TN diagnosis is based primarily on the person’s history and description of symptoms, along with results from physical and neurological examinations. Because of overlapping symptoms and the large number of conditions that can cause facial pain, obtaining a correct diagnosis is difficult, but finding the cause of the pain is important as the treatments for different types of pain may differ. Pharmacological treatment options include anticonvulsant medications used to block nerve firing and tricyclic antidepressants used to treat pain. Common analgesics and opioids are not usually helpful in treating the pain. The condition is progressive. The attacks often worsen over time, with fewer and shorter pain-free periods before they recur. Eventually, the pain-free intervals disappear and medication to control the pain becomes less effective. Patients opt to have surgery which may or may not be effective. Pain free periods after surgery vary. Sometimes surgery exacerbates the pain. Who is Affected? TN occurs most often in people over age 50, although it can occur at any age, including infancy. The incidence of newly diagnosed cases of TN in the United States population averages approximately 4.3 per 100, 000 individuals (per year) and the average for women is slightly higher than for men. If people have TN for an average of 8 years, then a rough estimate of prevalence in United States is 108, 000. The definition of a rare disease in the United States is one that affects fewer than 200, 000 at any one time. Thus, TN is a rare disease.
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    cancer pain? Causes and Diagnosis People with cancer commonly experience pain. However, up to 95% of cancer pain can be treated successfully. Untreated pain can make other aspects of cancer seem worse. These include: Fatigue Weakness Shortness of breath Nausea Constipation Sleep disturbances Depression Anxiety Mental confusion Causes of pain Pain can come from the tumor itself, the cancer treatment, or causes unrelated to cancer. A good pain treatment plan will take care of pain from all causes. The tumor. A tumor growing in an organ, such as the liver, may stretch part of the organ. This stretching causes pain. If a tumor grows and spreads to the bones or other organs, it may put pressure on nerves and damage them, causing pain. Or if a tumor spreads or grows around the spinal cord, it can compress the spinal cord. This eventually leads to severe pain or paralysis if not treated. Surgery. It is normal to experience pain from cancer surgery. Most pain goes away after a while. But some people may have pain that lasts for months or years. This long-lasting pain can be from permanent damage to the nerves and the development of scar tissue. Radiation therapy. Pain may develop after radiation therapy and go away on its own. It can also develop months or years after radiation therapy to some parts of the body, such as the chest, breast, or spinal cord. Chemotherapy. Some chemotherapy can cause pain and numbness in the fingers and toes, called peripheral neuropathy. Usually this pain goes away when treatment is finished. But sometimes the damage is permanent. Learn more about the side effects of surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy. Other causes. People with cancer can still have pain from other causes. These include migraines, arthritis, or chronic low back pain. The treatment plan your health care team develops with you should include these kinds of pain. Any pain decreases your quality of life. Diagnosing pain You know your pain best. So it is important to discuss any new symptoms or a change in symptoms with your doctor or a pain specialist. They can help you find a medication or other pain relief method that works for you. To help your doctor better understand your pain, he or she may ask the following questions: Where does it hurt? When does the pain stop and start? How long has the pain been there? How much pain are you having on a scale of 0 to 10? What does the pain feel like, in your own words? For example, is it burning, stabbing, throbbing, or aching? Managing and treating pain Some people worry that pain medication is addictive or will make them sleepy or groggy. But there are many ways to manage and treat cancer pain, including medication and methods that don't use medication. Talk with your doctor to find the best treatment for your pain.
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    Discogenic Back Pain Occurs as the Condition of the Discs in the Spine Gradually Changes Over Time As we get older, the discs in our back go through a natural aging process. For many, this occurs without causing any noticeable symptoms. For others, it can be the source of persistent lower Back or Neck Pain. Those most commonly affected are 30 to 60 years of age. If you are among those who suffer, the good news is that Discogenic back pain usually improves with the proper medical attention. Our Pain Management Specialists[Pain Physician] will help you understand what’s causing your Pain, develop personalized Non-Surgical Treatment regimens to resolve your Pain, and strengthen your Spine now and for years to come. How & Why Does Discogenic Back Pain Develop? Discogenic pain occurs as the condition of the discs in the spine gradually changes over time. It is one of the most prevalent causes of acute or chronic back pain. You may experience only a few days of pain, or you may suffer prolonged, moderate to severe, recurrent pain. Most discogenic pain occurs in the lumbar spine (lower back). When pain occurs, it may be spontaneous or it may result from an activity. The most frequent symptoms of Discogenic Pain are Lower Back Pain and Spasm. Occasionally, pain may radiate to the buttocks, groin, or thighs. Typically, the pain is made worse by bending, sitting, or standing in a stationary position, and often relieved by lying down. However, mild activity such as walking may actually provide some relief. Certain tasks, such as lifting or bending, will likely make the symptoms worse. The lumbar (lower) spine has five vertebrae with soft discs in between. Each disc is composed of a tough outer ring (annulus) surrounding a soft center (nucleus). When we are young, the discs consist predominantly of water (about 80%), but as we age, the discs lose hydration and become more susceptible to cracking and fissures called Annular tears. These tears lead to inflammation and pain. " Symptoms" *Lower (lumbar) Back Pain *spasms *Pain radiating to the buttocks, groin, or thighs Diagnosis Proper diagnosis starts with an experienced pain management doctor.The type of pain that you may have with Discogenic Back Pain can be similar to the symptoms of several types of disorders. Accurately determining the correct source of your pain is critical to successful treatment. Begins with a thorough clinical evaluation Including a complete medical history, analysis of your symptoms, and physical examination Testing may include xW-rays, MRI and/or CT scans, and electro-diagnosis (EMG) These advanced diagnostic techniques definitively pinpoint the source of pain Possible Treatments*** 1-Disc Regenerative Therapy 2-Epidural Nerve Block 3-Spinal Cord Stimulation We're Here to Help get Your Life Back Living with acute or chronic discogenic back pain is a daily struggle and finding relief can be challenging. We are here for you. Our highly skilled pain doctors get right to the source of your pain and will provide treatment tailored to your needs. Stop letting pain ruin your life, discuss in detail with Best Pain Specialist in Jaipur, Dr.sanjay sharma
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