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    Trigeminal Neuralgia Well known painful condition also known as Suicidal disease to Trigeminal neuralgia is a chronic pain condition that affects the trigeminal nerve, which carries sensation from your face to your brain. If you have trigeminal neuralgia, even mild stimulation of your face — such as from brushing your teeth or putting on makeup — may trigger a jolt of excruciating pain. You may initially experience short, mild attacks. But trigeminal neuralgia can progress and cause longer, more-frequent bouts of searing pain. Trigeminal neuralgia affects women more often than men, and it's more likely to occur in people who are older than 50. Because of the variety of treatment options available, having trigeminal neuralgia doesn't necessarily mean you're doomed to a life of pain. Doctors usually can effectively manage trigeminal Neuralgia with medications, injections or surgery. Radiofrequency ablation is best non surgical intervention.under fluroscopic guidance by any interventional pain physician.who is expert one to manage without opening your skull. Branches of the trigeminal nerve There are three branches of trigeminal nerve originated from ganglion. 1-Ophthalmic 2-maxillary 3-mandibular Trigeminal neuralgia symptoms may include Any single division or mixed pattern of one or more of these division. Episodes of severe, shooting or jabbing pain that may feel like an electric shock Spontaneous attacks of pain or attacks triggered by things such as touching the face, chewing, speaking or brushing teeth Bouts of pain lasting from a few seconds to several minutes Episodes of several attacks lasting days, weeks, months or longer — some people have periods when they experience no pain Constant aching, burning feeling that may occur before it evolves into the spasm-like pain of trigeminal neuralgia Pain in areas supplied by the trigeminal nerve, including the cheek, jaw, teeth, gums, lips, or less often the eye and forehead Pain affecting one side of the face at a time, though may rarely affect both sides of the face Pain focused in one spot or spread in a wider pattern Attacks that become more frequent and intense over time When to see a doctor If you experience facial pain, particularly prolonged or recurring pain or pain unrelieved by over-the-counter pain relievers, most often patient get Treatment from dentist, who knowingly or unknowingly derooted many teeth.made edentulous jaw.sometime patient goes to ENT surgeon, because of ear pain problem.but none has no definite roles in Pain management. Any Neurophysician or Pain physician is right doctors to consult for further management.but Pain physician not only facilate medical treatment.but he performed minimal invasive procedures like - 1-glycerol rhizolysis 2-Radiofrequency thermocoagulation 3-Ballon decompression 4-Gama knife therapy Causes- In trigeminal neuralgia, also called tic douloureux, the trigeminal nerve's function is disrupted. Usually, the problem is contact between a normal blood vessel — in this case, an artery or a vein — and the trigeminal nerve at the base of your brain. This contact puts pressure on the nerve and causes it to malfunction. Trigeminal Neuralgia can occur as a result of aging, or it can be related to multiple sclerosis or a similar disorder that damages the myelin sheath protecting certain nerves. Trigeminal neuralgia can also be caused by a tumor compressing the trigeminal nerve. Some patients may experience Trigeminal neuralgia due to a Brain lesion or other abnormalities. In other cases, surgical injuries, stroke or facial trauma may be responsible for trigeminal neuralgia. Triggers factors- A variety of triggers may set off the pain of trigeminal Neuralgia, including: Shaving Touching your face Eating food Drinking Brushing your teeth Talking/speech Putting on makeup Encountering a breeze Smiling/chewing Washing your face
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    Minimally Invasive Treatment of #Vertebral Compression Fractures: Vertebral Augmentation Implant, #Kyphoplasty, #Vertebroplasty Written by dr lalit bhardwaj neurosurgeon, dr sanjay sharma interventional pain physician from apex hospital neurosurgery and pain medicine department jaipur, india. Spinal compression fractures may be treated with surgery. Vertebral Augmentation Implant, Kyphoplasty, and Vertebroplasty are three minimally invasive treatments for thoracic and lumbar spinal compression fractures. These procedures use bone cement. A newer type of vertebral augmentation system is now performed that is different from vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty. This minimally invasive treatment for thoracic and lumbar spinal compression fractures utilizes a continuous loop-like spinal implant. Like other procedures, it is performed using image-guidance. During the percutaneous (through the skin) procedure, the implant is delivered through a small, single incision. After the implant is in place, bone cement is injected and the implant is removed. Kyphoplasty During kyphoplasty, also called balloon kyphoplasty, a thin tube is inserted into the collapsed vertebra. Attached to the tube is a small balloon that, when inflated, moves the broken bone creating a space. The balloon is removed and the space is filled with thick liquid bone cement. Balloon kyphoplasty can relieve pain and stabilizes the compression spinal fracture. In addition, kyphoplasty may also restore vertebral height thus reducing spinal deformity. Vertebroplasty During vertebroplasty, the cement is injected into the collapsed vertebrae. The bone cement rapidly hardens and stabilizes the fracture. Vertebroplasty can help to relieve pain and may strengthen other vertebrae that are weak but not fractured. Kyphoplasty and vertebroplasty are peformed using thin tubes (called cannulas). A cannula is passed through the skin and into the vertebral body. The patient usually goes home the same day. Some patients may stay overnight in the hospital. The small incision(s) where the cannula(s) was inserted often do not require stitches. Vertebral Augmentation Implant, Kyphoplasty and Vertebroplasty These procedures may decrease or eliminate pain associated with a thoracic or lumbar vertebral compression fracture. With kyphoplasty or vertebroplasty, there is a risk of bone cement migrating out of place (called extravasation). As with any surgical procedure, there are risks such as infection.Your interventional physician or surgeon will explain each procedure's benefits and risks.
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