OK
12
12

Order Summary

3 Services

 1,234

View Cart
MORE
Store Timings
    search button image
    latest update icon
    cancer pain? Causes and Diagnosis People with cancer commonly experience pain. However, up to 95% of cancer pain can be treated successfully. Untreated pain can make other aspects of cancer seem worse. These include: Fatigue Weakness Shortness of breath Nausea Constipation Sleep disturbances Depression Anxiety Mental confusion Causes of pain Pain can come from the tumor itself, the cancer treatment, or causes unrelated to cancer. A good pain treatment plan will take care of pain from all causes. The tumor. A tumor growing in an organ, such as the liver, may stretch part of the organ. This stretching causes pain. If a tumor grows and spreads to the bones or other organs, it may put pressure on nerves and damage them, causing pain. Or if a tumor spreads or grows around the spinal cord, it can compress the spinal cord. This eventually leads to severe pain or paralysis if not treated. Surgery. It is normal to experience pain from cancer surgery. Most pain goes away after a while. But some people may have pain that lasts for months or years. This long-lasting pain can be from permanent damage to the nerves and the development of scar tissue. Radiation therapy. Pain may develop after radiation therapy and go away on its own. It can also develop months or years after radiation therapy to some parts of the body, such as the chest, breast, or spinal cord. Chemotherapy. Some chemotherapy can cause pain and numbness in the fingers and toes, called peripheral neuropathy. Usually this pain goes away when treatment is finished. But sometimes the damage is permanent. Learn more about the side effects of surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy. Other causes. People with cancer can still have pain from other causes. These include migraines, arthritis, or chronic low back pain. The treatment plan your health care team develops with you should include these kinds of pain. Any pain decreases your quality of life. Diagnosing pain You know your pain best. So it is important to discuss any new symptoms or a change in symptoms with your doctor or a pain specialist. They can help you find a medication or other pain relief method that works for you. To help your doctor better understand your pain, he or she may ask the following questions: Where does it hurt? When does the pain stop and start? How long has the pain been there? How much pain are you having on a scale of 0 to 10? What does the pain feel like, in your own words? For example, is it burning, stabbing, throbbing, or aching? Managing and treating pain Some people worry that pain medication is addictive or will make them sleepy or groggy. But there are many ways to manage and treat cancer pain, including medication and methods that don't use medication. Talk with your doctor to find the best treatment for your pain.
    Read More
    Details
    Query
    Share
    `
    SEND
    latest update icon
    Minimally invasive spine surgery (MISS) uses advanced technology and innovative techniques to treat back pain and neck pain caused by a variety of spinal disorders .dr sanjay sharma interventional pain physician says, Some of the spinal conditions MISS can treat are: *degenerative disc disease *herniated discs *scoliosis *spinal stenosis Through computer-assisted technology and highly specialized tools, minimally invasive surgery is an attractive option for patients who want a quicker recovery after surgery, less post-operative pain, and smaller incisions.from few milimeter to centimeters but not a big incision, what it was practice in past years, or by conventional spine surgeons. Minimally invasive spine surgery minimizes soft tissue damage (eg, muscles). MISS may be a less risky, less invasive option compared to traditional open spine surgery. Although there are advantages of MISS, the goals of MISS procedures are the same as open traditional procedures. The 2 main goals of minimally invasive spine surgery are: 1-Decompression: This is used to take pressure off (to decompress) your spinal cord or nerve roots. That pressure can cause pinched nerves and pain. The goal of this procedure is to relieve the pressure and reduce your pain. 2-Stabilization: Sometimes a mobile segment can be the source of pain or abnormal movement can cause pain. When this happens, a stabilizing surgery may be needed. This is typically a fusion, often done with instrumentation. There are 3 main minimally invasive spine surgery techniques: 1-Mini-open: This is similar to an open procedure, but has fewer risks, such as less blood loss during surgery and less risk of infection because the incision is much smaller. Advances in visualization have made mini-open procedures possible. 2-Tubular: This surgery involves a tubular retractor, which acts as a tunnel that passes through your back muscles to access your spine. MISS with a tubular retractor is commonly referred to as a "muscle-splitting" approach. Compared to open spine surgery, there is less muscle damage and less blood loss when using a tubular retractor. 3-Endoscopic: This spine surgery uses a tiny video camera called an endoscope—which is smaller than a dime—to pass through small surgical incisions (usually less than 2 cm) to access your spine. According to the American Association of Neurological Surgeons, this procedure is commonly referred to as a "keyhole surgery" because an endoscope guides surgeons by showing them an internal view of your body on screens in the operating room. However, there are only a few spine surgeries that use endoscopes. These 3 types of MISS can be used in specific spine surgeries, such as [a]discectomy, [b]foraminotomy, [c]laminectomy [d] laminotomy. Sometimes a fluoroscope is used during minimally invasive spine surgery. Fluoroscopes are x-ray machines used to guide your surgeon during your procedure. They give your surgeon the best views of your spine. Keep in mind, though, that surgery should be a last resort for treating your pain caused by a spine condition. If you've tried non-surgical treatments, such as pain medications, rest, and physical therapy, in the last 6 to 12 months and they're not working for you, then you may want to consider spine surgery, and minimally invasive spine surgery may be an option for you.
    Read More
    Details
    Query
    Share
    `
    SEND
    Next >
    company logo